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Public Works & Natural Resources

Engineering Services

FAQ's

Q. How do I get a copy of an Aerial Map for Longmont?

Q. Who do I notify when I'm excavating in my yard?

Q. How do I get a current copy of the City of Longmont Design Standards and Construction Specifications?

Q. How do I get floodplain information?

Q. What do I do if my street is flooding?

Q. How do I get to your office?

Q. What is your fax number?

Q. Who do I speak to regarding the City of Longmont's Letter of Credit process?

Q. How can I get lot dimensions?

Q. Where do I get a copy of a plat?

Q. How do I obtain a Work in the Right-of-Way Permit?

Q. My sidewalk is in dis-repair, how can I get it fixed?

Q. How can I get a new stop sign installed?

Q. Who do I speak to regarding traffic in Longmont?

Q. How do I report a traffic signal that is malfunctioning or a stop sign that has been damaged?

Q. How do I obtain a grading permit?

Q. I have a question about my trash/recycling, who should I contact?

Q. How do obtain a copy of a traffic study?

Q. Why don't we use more 4-way STOPs?

Q. There are a lot of children on my street. Can the City put up "SLOW Children Playing" signs to help protect them?

Q. How do I go about getting a crosswalk installed?

Q. How do I get a copy of an Aerial Map for Longmont?

A. We have a variety of maps and aerial photos available, please call (303)651-8304 or email Joe Rourke.

Q. Who do I notify when I'm excavating in my yard?

A. Utility Notification Center of Colorado (UNCC)at 1(800)922-1987 and City of Longmont at (303)774-4884 which covers Water, Sewer, Storm Sewer, Parks.

Q. How do I get a current copy of the City of Longmont Design Standards and Construction Specifications?

A. The City of Longmont Design Standards and Construction Specifications are available on the website for download and available for purchase (CD or binder copy) at Public Works Engineering, 385 Kimbarks Street, Longmont, (303)651-8304.

Q. How do I get floodplain information?

A. We have a floodplain maps available for all areas of the City of Longmont. Please call (303) 651-8311 or email Kathy Ramberg.

Q. What do I do if my street is flooding?

A. During business hours, call (303) 651-8416. After hours, call Police Dispatch at (303)651-8501 and Storm Drainage crews will be contacted.

Q. How do I get to your office?

A. Engineering Services is located in the Development Services Center at 385 Kimbark Street, Longmont, Colorado. From I-25, take Exit #240, the Longmont - State Highway 119 Exit, west for six miles. State Highway turns into 3rd Avenue. The Development Services Center is located on the west side of Kimbark Street one block north of 3rd Avenue.

From Main Street (State Highway 287) take 3rd Avenue to the east one block. The Development Services Center is located on the west side of Kimbark Street one block north of 3rd Avenue.

Q. What is your fax number?

A. (303)651-8352

Q. Who do I speak to regarding the City of Longmont's Letter of Credit process?

A. Please call (303)651-8309 or email Cindy McIntosh.

Q. How can I get lot dimensions?

A. Please call (303)651-8304.

Q. Where do I get a copy of a plat?

A. Please call (303)651-8304 or email Joe Rourke.

Q. How do I obtain a Work in the Right-of-Way Permit?

A. Please call (303)651-8757 or email Len Marques.

Q. My sidewalk is in dis-repair, how can I get it fixed?

A. Please call (303)651-8304.

Q. How can I get a new stop sign installed?

A. Please call (303)651-8304.

Q. Who do I speak to regarding traffic in Longmont?

A. Please call (303)651-8304.

Q. How do I report a traffic signal that is malfunctioning or a stop sign that has been damaged?

During business hours, contact Public Works Operations at (303)651-8416. After business hours, contact Police Dispatch at (303) 651-8501.

Q. How do I obtain a grading permit?

A. Please call (303)651-8908 or email Allan Bryning.

Q. How do obtain a copy of a traffic study?

A. Please call (303)651-8615 or email Debbie Norton.

Why don't we use more 4-way STOPs?

A 4-way STOP can be very useful at intersections where the traffic on each approach is approximately equal and steady throughout the day, or at an intersection where certain types of accidents have consistently been a problem. However, when this type of control is used when these conditions do not exist, it may actually cause more problems than it solves. Interestingly, most research has found that STOP signs do not decrease the overall speed of traffic. Thus, we do not use them for speed control.

An inappropriately placed STOP sign is often ignored by motorists either because of contempt for the sign or because the driver simply did not expect it to be there. This can lead to an increase in accident potential at the intersection for crossing motorists and pedestrians who falsely believe an oncoming vehicle will stop because of the sign. This problem also tends to increase the potential for rear end accidents where one car stops for the sign but the following car does not. In addition, increased vehicle delay, increased fuel consumption, more noise pollution and more air pollution result when an inappropriately placed 4-way STOP is present.

To help ensure that 4-way STOPs are only installed when necessary and thus avoid the problems associated with them, engineering standards have been established to determine the need for 4-way STOPs. These "warrants" have been established by the U.S. Department of Transportation based on the expertise and experience of transportation engineers nationwide. These warrants are published as part of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) by the Federal Highway Administration. The State of Colorado and the City of Longmont have adopted the MUTCD as the guide for installation of all traffic control devices including 4-way STOPs.

There are a lot of children on my street. Can the City put up "SLOW Children Playing" signs to help protect them?

The City of Longmont does not install "SLOW Children Playing" type signs. The reason is that at best, they have been found to do nothing. They do not change the way motorists drive. At worst, they may give parents and their children a false sense of security and encourage parents to let their kids play in the street.

Children should not be encouraged to play in or near streets. A much better solution than installing ineffective signs is to educate children to respect moving vehicles, not allow them to play in the street and teach them how to be safe pedestrians.

How do I go about getting a crosswalk installed?

Remember, State law says that a crosswalk exists at any intersection whether or not markings exist. Pedestrians and motorists have the same legal rights and duties at unmarked crosswalks at intersections as they do at a location with crosswalk markings.

Marked crosswalks are not installed arbitrarily. The main function of a marked crosswalk is to serve as a guide to indicate to pedestrians the appropriate place to cross. They are also used to warn motorists of potential pedestrian crossings. However, they are only effective for this purpose where pedestrian volumes are relatively high and the potential for conflict with vehicles is also high. Unwarranted or random crosswalks that are seldom used by pedestrians may breed disrespect for the devices and make the ones that are truly necessary even less effective.

Several recent research studies have suggested that pedestrian accident rates are often higher in marked crosswalks than they are in unmarked crosswalks. So, we are very careful where we put them. In general, the City of Longmont installs marked crosswalks at signalized intersections, along designated walk to school routes where children must cross busy streets at uncontrolled locations and at other locations where the proper crossing location would not otherwise be obvious. In addition, the City will evaluate the need for crosswalks at other locations based on the volume of pedestrians and vehicles along with other factors such as the number of lanes and the speed of traffic.

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Updated 8/15/12

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